House in Multiple Occupancy licence (HMO)

A house in multiple occupations is usually a house or flat where two or more household live as their main residence and where some of the households share basic amenities like a bathroom, toilet or cooking facilities.

If you rent out a property for house in multiple occupancy, you may require a licence from your local authority.

The aim of the licence is to ensure that landlords are fit and proper persons, that the accommodation meets the required standards and that high risk housing is dealt with.

It’s an offence to run a HMO without a licence. Owners and managers who do so can be taken to court and fined up to £20,000 for the offence, and tenants can apply for a Rent Repayment order, which could mean the landlord would have to pay back up to 12 months’ worth of rent.

There are 2 kinds of HMO licences:

  1. Mandatory licence
    For HMOs with 3 or more storeys that are occupied by 5 or more persons forming two or more households. The fee for a mandatory licence is £140 per unit of accommodation.
  2. Additional licence
    For all other HMOs. Gwynedd Council has decided to make the additional licence relevant to all of Gwynedd in order to maintain standards. The fee for this licence is £140 per unit of accommodation.

Eligibility criteria
Applications must be made to the local housing authority.

A fee will be charged.

You must be a fit and proper person to hold the licence.

Application evaluation process
Licences will be granted if:

  • the house is, or can be made, suitable for multiple occupation
  • the applicant is a fit and proper person and the most appropriate person to hold the licence
  • the proposed manager has control of the house, and is a fit and proper person to be the manager
  • the management arrangements are satisfactory.

Apply
For more information and an application form, call 01766 771000.

Relevant legislation
Housing Act 2004 
Legislation summary 

Will tacit consent apply?
No. It is in the public interest that the authority must process your application before it can be granted. If you have not heard from the local authority within a reasonable period, please contact it.


Failed application redress
Please contact your local authority in the first instance.

You may appeal to a residential property tribunal.

Any appeal must be made within 28 days of the decision being made.


Licence holder redress
Please contact your local authority in the first instance.

You may appeal to a residential property tribunal regarding conditions attached to a licence or any decision to vary or revoke a licence.

Any appeal must be made within 28 days of the decision being made.

Trade associations
British Property Federation (BPF)
National Federation of Property Professionals